My 45 Favorite Snack Options for Kids [packaged + prep-free]

This post is unsponsored. I was not compensated nor asked to include any of the following products, however I did receive samples of some of the following products for the purpose of this post. All opinions are my own.


My 45 Favorite Snack Options for Kids

(Plus 15 of My Favorite Homemade Ones!)

Even in feeding my own kids three meals and two snacks a day, I still feel stuck for healthy, practical ideas at times. Add that to the confusion of walking down any given snack aisles (even as a dietitian mom), and I get why other parents are overwhelmed when trying to find healthy, kid-friendly snack options.

Last year, I shared a post on “The Best Pre-Packaged Snack Foods,” which included information on different types of snack foods (i.e. fun foods, sometimes foods, and everyday foods) as well as ideas on how such snack foods can have a healthy place in your child’s diet. This post also included a free printable shopping list (see below) of My 20 Favorite Pre-Packaged Snack Foods from Target, which many of you downloaded and said that you enjoyed (which you can also download for free here).

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That’s why in this post, I thought I would not only revisit the conversation of snack foods and update some of my recommendations in each “category” (see below: bars + bites, starchy snacks, fruit snacks, and protein-packed snacks). My goal in this post is to further eliminate all guesswork and curate a list of my favorite snacks within each category. I get several inquiries about where to buy these snacks as well (when I share them on Instagram or Facebook), so I have shared links for the best places to buy each of these products as well to make it even easier for you to restock your own pantry (now that the school year is in full swing)!

 
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Although I want to make seeing the following snack food suggestions as straight-forward as possible, I already am anticipating some of the feedback I might get from families who find these either impractical, inferior, not cost-effective nor environmentally-friendly, or who are ultimately unclear on how these snacks fit into an overall healthy lifestyle.

I have tried to address those possible concerns here:

First, pre-packaged snacks are often more expensive.

I don’t recommend these to blow anyone’s food budget but rather because I know many families out there are in need of convenient, readily-available snack options that require no prep. That said, I respect not all of these options may be a good fit for every family’s budget and have tried to provide ideas at a variety of price points. Some of the snacks suggested in this post are in fact more expensive than mainstream alternatives on the market. Typically, this is due to higher-quality ingredients yielding a more natural, nutrient-dense product than competing, lesser expensive varieties. For my family, I prefer to invest in higher-quality packaged snacks and saving them for when we need them (on the go, when traveling, and on the occasional school day when we are in a rush or don’t have other homemade options ready). This lessens how often we eat them, stretching our food dollar further without compromising quality. Many of the following options also may be purchased either on sale or in bulk (for a discount) or in larger sized packages and then divided up into their own smaller, snack-sized containers to help save. Otherwise, some of these pre-packaged might have recipes so you can recreate similar homemade snacks (instead of always reaching for pre-packaged).

Second, pre-packaged snacks aren’t always nutritionally superior to ones you could make yourself.

If you have the time and energy to recreate items in the categories below, I encourage you to do so as you might be able to pack even more nutrition into them. However, for the purposes of this post, I aimed to include options that I personally and professionally consider nutrient-rich options in the given category (when compared to the alternative, pre-packaged items on the market). I have included some of the nutrition and ingredients list information I look for in each of the respective category.

Third, pre-packaged snacks create more waste.

I admit that at times, I weigh the convenience of pre-packaged snacks over considering how environmentally friendly the packaging is of such products. That’s why, as mentioned above, I tend to serve homemade snacks or portioning pre-made snacks into a reusable snack bag when able. You can find some of my favorite reusable snack bags here.

Fourth, consider a few of the following tips if sending any of the following packaged snacks to school.

  • Make sure you know the dietary restrictions of your child’s school and avoid sending any restricted allergens. Many of the options below include nuts, so use your discretion for if and when such snacks are safe and appropriate. If you need peanut-free ideas, read this post for 12 peanut-free pre-made and portable snack ideas.

  • Tear a small opening in packaging so it makes it easier for your child to open it come lunch or snack time. This gives them more time to eat, rather than using that time to wait on their teacher (who likely has to open the packages for several kid’s!).

  • If your child’s school requires you to send snacks labeled, consider using one of the reusable bags (shared above) with a reusable name label on it. This lessens the work of having to write on it each day (especially since Sharpies don’t always write easily on all snack options).

Fifth, know how to offer snacks.

No matter WHAT you offer, if you don’t have a foundation for WHEN food is offered, all of your efforts can still get derailed. That’s why it is important to both choose appropriate snack food options, as shared in my post on The Best Pre-Packaged Snack Foods, and to be mindful about how to feed your child at snack time. Spacing snacks 2-3 hours from meal times and enforcing a “kitchen is closed” at all other times can help to promote your child to eat more of the nutrient-dense items when offered and eliminate mindless grazing on potentially less- healthful snack foods. Wondering how to feed your child at snack time? Read more here >>



My 45 Favorite Snack Options for Kids [Packaged + Prep-Free]

Disclaimer: This post includes affiliate links to my Amazon shop. These do not cost you anything extra to use; they will only provide Veggies & Virtue a small commission for any purchases made through this link. Thank you for supporting this small business!

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Bars + Bites (Non-Perishable + Packaged)

I am a big fan of bars and energy bites as a way to pack a lot of nutrition into a small, convenient package. With so many bars over-saturating the market, however, it can quickly become overwhelming to know which ones to buy. Since bars and bites can vary a lot in their taste, texture, and overall nutritional as well, I have also included a bit of information below on each bar/bite includes that will hopefully help guide you in your buying decisions a bit about which to buy and why.

Here are a few nutritional considerations for how I came to select the following bars:

  • Sugar: Many “healthy” bars on the market have considerable amounts of added sugar. Considering many children already get more added sugar than they need in their diet, parents should consider the source and amount of sugar in the bars and bites they buy. Looking for bars with only naturally occurring sugar in the ingredients list (from sources like dates) is ideal. Otherwise, select bars with limited sources and amounts of added sugar. If an ingredients list states several sources of added sugar and/or exceeds around 6 grams of sugar per serving (equivalent to 25% of the max amount of added sugar a toddler should have in a day), try to avoid and select another bar or bite instead. Wondering how much sugar your child needs? Read more here >>

  • Fat: Bars and bites are an excellent way to get healthy fats into children without the choking hazard of whole nuts. This fat source in bars also provides satiation, so kids won’t become hungry as quickly after eating. Since children need more fat than hey do protein in their diets, prioritize a bar that offers healthy fat over “protein bars” that might be more intended for adults. Wondering how much fat your child needs? Read more here >>

  • Protein: Protein that comes naturally-occurring from sources like nuts and seeds make a great option in snack bars or bites that you want to sustain your child for longer than say, a carbohydrate-rich bar would. Otherwise, there is rarely a need to choose bars or bites for young children though that have added sources of protein (i.e. in the form of protein isolates). That’s because when distributed across three meals and two or three snacks a day, most children are already getting their protein needs met without such added sources. Wondering how much protein your child needs? Read more here >>

Top 10 Bars + Bites (in no particular order):

  1. RXBAR Kids

    RXBARs have permanent residence in my own life these days. As one of the few bars that legitimately keep me feeling full between meals or when my own mom lunch gets bumped hours behind when I feed my kids, I can’t even count how many times these have protected me from getting hangry. When RXBAR came out with the kids option of bars, I was immediately sold. The ingredients list is unmatched in the industry for being full of the fuel I want my kids to eat and yet can’t conveniently get into them on the go in the way RXBAR Kids has captured to in this smaller sized bar. With kid-friendly flavors, RXBAR Kids are now one of the top bars we tuck into the diaper bag or in the car as an emergency snack as I know they will tie us over longer than many more carbohydrate-rich bars. From our own experience, RXBAR keep us feeling full the longest, which makes them great when you need a more substantial snack bar (or to avoid if you need a light snack close to a meal). The texture of RXBAR Kids is a bit more tough to chew through than other bars and can get stuck to teeth, so I know it took some getting used to for both myself and my girls. With some re-exposure though, we have started to enjoy these bars as one of our favorites. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon. I find the RXBAR website and Sprouts tend to have the best deals on these bars.

  2. LARABAR minis

    LARABARs have long been a favorite of mine, even before the “bar market” exploded into what it is today. They were early adopters of the simple ingredients list and keeping bars a wholesome source of nutrition. I particularly appreciate that all LARABARs use dates in their base as the source of sweetener, as this makes them tasty to kids without needing to add any additional sugar. While the nutrition facts reads higher in sugar than some other bars, this again is from real food (dates) rather than added sugar, and thus less of a consideration or concern in my book. For parents with small children, I often encourage LARABARs as a safe way to include nuts in a child’s diet. Compared to offering kids bars with large nut pieces or a handful of nuts when active or out and about, I feel more comfortable recommending snacks like LARABARs that offer the nutrition of nuts without the same choking hazard. While I love all of the LARABARs, their LARABAR minis are another great option for small children as one to toss in a lunchbox, have as a light snack, or offer alongside something else. The smaller size helps lessen the situations when your child might only eat half of a bar and then potentially waste the rest. I am unsure if they are phasing out the minis (as they aren’t shown on the LARABAR website), but they have been and will continue to be a favorite here as available. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon. On the LARABAR website (as of this posting), the mini bars do not exist. I continue to see them in stores like Kroger and Target though, as well as on Amazon.

  3. KIND Kids

    If your kids are used to granola bars that more closely resemble a candy bar, this can be a great way to food chain to a healthier alternative. With 5 grams of sugar, this is less than most competitors while also being made with much more natural and nutrient-dense ingredients. There are also some tasty nut-free flavor options that make this a fun “competitive" food” for school (should your kid be like mine and want “what everyone else has”)! Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon.

  4. KIND Healthy Grains Bars

    While a little bigger than the KIND Kids bar, this one still only has 5 grams of sugar per bar. It is a tasty granola-bar option for bigger appetites, bigger kids (or adults, as my husband and I eat these too!), or when a bit more snack is merited. There are several flavor options as well, again with nut-free options that add some variety to snacks for school or after school sports. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon.

  5. Health Warrior Chia Bar

    This chia bar packs several real food ingredients into a small bar, making it perfect for little tummies who need good nutrition in smaller sizes. With only 3 grams of sugar and several flavors to try, this is a great way to go for a granola-bar alternative. My kids love the new chocolate chip flavor! Similar to the texture of a LARABAR, this too is a softer option of bars for kids who might not be able to bite into other bars or need small pieces torn off to eat. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon. Use discount code veggiesvirtue20 for 20% off of first purchase when shopping on healthwarrior.com.

  6. Health Warrior Pumpkin Seed Bar

    These pumpkin bars are organic and made up of simple ingredients (just pumpkin seeds, honey, and spices) and yet taste like a treat! With nut free flavor options, we have found them helpful as a convenient pre-packaged bar option that we can send to school. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon. Use discount code veggiesvirtue20 for 20% off of first purchase when shopping on healthwarrior.com.

  7. Made in Nature Figgy Pops

    Tied with maybe muffins, I live by energy balls as quick and easy options I can eat with one hand while still getting a decent amount of nutrition packed in. Since I am not always able to make them at home though nor do I always have the right ingredients on hand, I have become particularly fond of these Figgy Pops for a pre-made energy bite option. With several flavors and even nut free options, these Made in Nature Figgy Pops are a new mainstay for #momlife and fueling active little kids with healthy AND convenient snack options. Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon.

  8. MySuperSnack Granola Bites

    These include what you love about an oatmeal cookie in a convenient snack-sized shape. With more fat and fiber than most bars on the market, these aren’t the highly refined granola bar option void of the fiber or fat that keep us full. Instead, these granola bites are a tasty way to convert “cookies” into a healthier snack option that is still sweet and satisfying. Shop for in stores or on Amazon.

  9. Nourish Snacks

    These granola bites option are more like a crunchy take on oatmeal cookies than the above granola bite while again packing much more nutrition in than a cookie-esque snack option. Again packing in less added sugar than other granola-based snacks, these granola bites were created by a fellow dietitian mom to satisfy the needs of a nutrient-dense snack while also catering to cravings of a sweet tooth. With a variety of flavors, my girls are really fond of taking a larger back of these Nourish Snacks to share or an individual bag of the nut-free options to school. Shop for in stores or on Amazon. You can select the 1-ounce single serve or 4-ounce snack-to-share size bag when buying on Amazon.

  10. Matt N’ Mikes SuperKid Bar

    The newest bar in the bunch, these bars by Matt n’ Mike have been ones we have really enjoyed. I am fond of the ingredients list being made up of simple, real foods while still being sweet enough and in a size that my kids enjoy. As a smaller business than some of the other bars listed above, these might not be as easily available at the grocery store but they are readily available online. Shop for in stores or online.

 
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Starchy Snacks (Non-Perishable + Packaged)

Often seen as “filler foods,” chips, crackers, and cookies are usually not essentials from a nutritional standpoint. However, they are often impossible to avoid in our diets, especially with kids. So although our goal is to always load up our kids with the most nutrient-dense options (especially when they are young and their stomachs are particularly small), the reality is we also may find ourselves wanting to offer some sweet or savory snacks on occasion.

It is important to not make any foods so forbidden that it becomes something our kids covet. Instead, our kids need to know how all foods fit, including items like chips, crackers, and cookies or other “fun foods” (read more on Fun Foods + Snacks here). Our job as parents is to look for options that allow us to offer better-for-you ingredients in such food options most of the time. I am not the type to instill fear in families for the occasional neon orange puff nor a creme-filled cookie eaten at birthday parties, classroom events, or special outings. I don’t usually recommend families have these on hand as everyday options however, as they can become particularly tempting to eat more often and crowd out other more nutrient-rich options when they’re in the house. When families are looking to find healthier options to have at home and on hand, the following are some that I have found to be both kid-friendly and dietitian-approved.

Here are a few nutritional considerations for how I came to select the following snack chips, crackers, and cookies:

  • Whole Grains: When possible, I always opt for starchy snack foods that contain some whole grains. This will be shown with a label from the Whole Grain Council on the front of packaging, a marketing claim of “X amount of whole grains per serving,” or by viewing the ingredients list to make sure that the first ingredient in a whole grain. Although having a whole grain snack doesn’t necessarily equate to it having more fiber, often times such snacks will still be nutritionally superior by offering more protein, vitamins, and minerals than snack foods made with refined grains. Wondering how much fat your child needs? Read more here >>

  • Ingredients list: Bars and bites are an excellent way to get healthy fats into children without the choking hazard of whole nuts. This fat source in bars also provides satiation, so kids won’t become hungry as quickly after eating. Since children need more fat than hey do protein in their diets, prioritize a bar that offers healthy fat over “protein bars” that might be more intended for adults. Wondering how much fat your child needs? Read more here >>

  • Bonus Ingredients: After seeing a need to make such starchy snack foods more healthy, many food manufacturers are starting to create more nutrient-dense varieties by adding in otherwise nontraditional ingredients to these options. Fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and even legumes are now more commonplace in crunchy, starchy snacks. When possible, parents should opt for starchy snacks that include bonus ingredients (and thus nutritional benefits!).

Top 15 Starchy Snacks (in no particular order):

    1. Nourish Mini Popcorn Chips: Shop for in stores or on Amazon

    2. MySuperCookies Snack Packs: Shop for in stores or on Amazon

    3. Bitsy’s Smart Crackers: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    4. Bitsy’s Smart Cookies: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    5. Peeled Peas Please: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    6. Rhythm Superfood Chips: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    7. Boom Chicka Pop Sea Salt Popcorn: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    8. Annie’s Whole Grain Bunny Crackers: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    9. Triscuits Whole Grain Crackers: Shop for in stores

    10. Puffworks: Shop for on Amazon

    11. Hippeas Organic Cheese Puffs: Shop for in stores or on Amazon

    12. Simple Mills Almond Crackers: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    13. Moon Cheese: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

    14. Crunch-A-Mame: Shop for in stores or on Amazon

    15. Dry Cereal (like Kashi Heart to Heart or Barbara’s Puffins)

 
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Fruit Snacks (Non-Perishable + Packaged)

I am all for getting our fruits and vegetables in, but sometimes fresh options just aren’t realistic. That’s why I often rely on the following non-perishable and packaged options. With only real fruit in the ingredients, no added sugar, ingredients, or food dyes are necessary to make these “fruit snacks” a sweet snack for kids.

Here are a few nutritional considerations for how I came to select the following fruit snacks:

  • Sugar source: Opt for “fruit snacks” that contain only fruit in the ingredients list. Ideally, limit those with added fruit concentrates as these increase the sugar content without offering the same fiber and overall nutritional benefits of whole fruit. Although some parents may be concerned that the sugar content (as shown on the nutrition facts label) appears “high” even in fruit snacks made only with fruit, rest assured this is all naturally occurring sugar from fruit (and not added sugars) and can be used to offer valuable nutrition. Serve as a stand alone snack for a quick energy source (due to the higher amount of sugar/simple carbohydrates), or pair it with something that has a bit of fat, fiber, or protein to give it a bit more staying power.

  • Fiber: Fruit-based snacks tend to be a compact source of carbohydrates for their fruit-based equivalent. Often times, the fiber from the fruit is lost in the processing, so when possible, choose fruit-based snacks that have retained some fiber.

  • Ingredients List: Keep it simple. There should be very few foods on the ingredients list outside of fruit, potentially ascorbic acid (a source of vitamin C that acts as a preservative), and maybe added items like chia seeds (as in the case of the Pressed bars below).

Top 10 Fruit Snacks (in no particular order):

  1. Made in Nature dried fruit: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  2. Fruit Bliss snack packs: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  3. Kind Pressed bars: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  4. Peeled dried fruit: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  5. Bare apple chips: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  6. That’s It bars: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  7. Organic boxes of raisins: Shop for in stores (or put the organic ones in a large bag from Costco into smaller containers)

  8. Chukar Cherries: Shop for online or on Amazon

  9. Freeze-dried fruits: Shop for in stores or on Amazon

  10. Organic Applesauce pouches: Shop for in stores (also at Costco)

 
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Protein-Packed Snacks (Both Perishable and Non-Perishable + Packaged)

One of the best ways to ensure your kids keep asking for more snacks is to offer ones that are full of quick energy and refined carbohydrates (even if natural carbs from fruit) without anything to go with it. If, however, you need to offer a snack with a bit more staying power (more on that here), be sure to add in a protein source so your child stays full longer. Some of the best ways to do this without any extra effort is with the following quick sources of protein.

Here are a few considerations for how I came to select the following protein snacks:

  • Protein: Whether you opt for an option that it plant- or animal-based, any of the following protein options can make a nutritious addition to any snack. If you are only able to grab a bag of carrot or a whole apple otherwise, the following options can round out those snacks to make them both more satisfying and filling.

  • Perishability: Of all the snacks shared, this list is the only one that might include a perishable option. Offer variety on the days you have an ice pack with those that you need a shelf-stable option. An asterisk below denotes the protein options that are non-perishable.

  • Ingredients List: Keep it simple. These should be minimally processed with few added ingredients outside of the obvious protein itself.

Top 10 Protein-Packed Snacks (in no particular order):

  1. Babybel: Shop for in stores (We buy ours at Costco)

  2. Organic Cheese Sticks: Shop for in stores

  3. Good Culture Cottage Cheese cups: Shop for in stores

  4. Horizon Milk Boxes*: Shop for in stores (I find them on sale at Costco often)

  5. Hummus cups: Shop for in stores (We buy ours at Costco)

  6. Hard Boiled Eggs: Shop for in stores (including Costco)

  7. Vermont Uncured Pepperoni*: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  8. Biena Chickpea Snacks*: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  9. RX Nut butters*: Shop for in stores, online, or on Amazon

  10. Siggis Yogurt tubes, drinks, or triple cream cups: Shop for in stores


15 Favorite Go-To Homemade Snack Recipes

This list could be just as endless as the aisles of pre-packaged snack foods. I am often asked for recipes to the following though, so I have included our go-to homemade snack recipes as well. You can easily pack up any of these in place of one of the items above and take them with you. This is an ever-changing list in our household, but for now, here are our top ten favorites!

  1. Healthy Carrot Muffins (and others shared on Muffin Club here)

  2. Blueberry Lemon Energy Bites

  3. Chocolate Chip Oat Energy Bites

  4. Peppermint Energy Bites (like these or these)

  5. Green Smoothies (like this one) in a reusable pouch (like this one)

  6. Immune-Boosting Smoothies (like this one) in a reusable pouch (like this one)

  7. Homemade Apple Sauce (like this one but we leave the peels on!) in a reusable pouch (like this one)

  8. Homemade Granola (to add on top of a Siggis yogurt cup!)

  9. Homemade Granola Bar

  10. Avocado Banana Cookies

  11. Baked Oatmeal Bars

  12. Homemade Fruit Leather

  13. Homemade Gummies

  14. Chunky Monkey Bars

  15. Microwave Popcorn


While I am sure these lists will need to be updated and changed over time, I hope that for now they provide a helpful starting place to help you shop for healthier snacks for your family!

Gardening with Kids: October 2018 edition

I admit, we are in a season when I really can’t justify the garden being “one more thing.” Sometimes hobbies that are non-essential can quickly become overwhelming in seasons when we have little time or energy to spare (such as life with a newborn!). That’s why this month, I want to encourage each of you to remember:

It is okay to start small.

It is okay to go slow.

It is okay to embrace “this is a season.”

Just as gardens require fertile soil, constant watering, pruning, and pest control, we all know motherhood does so similarly. That’s why I am challenging myself as well as any of you with an interest in these monthly posts to be willing to take on only what you can to bear fruit.

If gardening is one of those things that ultimately won’t bear fruit (literally or figuratively!) to your family in this season, rain check these ideas until the time is right. However, if you find your family looking for a healthy, hands on opportunity to connect with real food and spend time learning about “healthy food” (which is MUCH more effective than talking about it with kids!), maybe you could consider what kind of garden makes sense for your family.

Then, get dirty and let it metaphorically remind you that the messes of motherhood are MANDATORY for true growth to occur. Our garden is an ongoing work in progress and trial and error process...also much like motherhood. So while I love the yield it sometimes brings (by way of fresh veggies), it is also such a small and subtle reminder for me in the way gardening parallels motherhood.

How could a garden encourage versus overwhelm you in the upcoming season?

 
 Our newest little gardener dressed for the part on our first day of Fall planting!

Our newest little gardener dressed for the part on our first day of Fall planting!

 

Areas of Growth in the Garden

Garden Yields Update

Total seasonal yield to date: 
None yet for Fall, as our Fall crops are going in this month! Due to some feedback we got at our local nursery, we are trying some less traditional “Fall produce” to see if they grow and how they do!

Plot 1: Green beans, sugar snap peas, and cucumbers

Plot 2: Kale, Spinach, and Swiss Chard

Plot 3: Fall cherry tomatoes, carrots, and beets

Plot 4: Waiting to plant broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussel sprouts once it cools off

Herb Garden: We are also finally starting our herb garden up closer to the house. For this, we have cilantro, parsley, thyme, oregano, basil, and rosemary.

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New Feeding Wins or Progress via Food Play

This is the second Fall garden we have done, but I can honestly say the first gardening season so far that my oldest daughter has actually been into participating very much (out of the total of four seasons).

She tends to be my child who is not terribly amused by my ideas or interests. While my two year old finds everything I am doing fascinating and always wants to “help",” my oldest daughter tends to be much more independent, spirited, and deeply engaged in her own interests. While I love this independence in her and try to foster an environment for her to pursue her own interests (rather than pushing my own), I would be lying if I said sometimes I didn’t wish she would take a genuine interest in the activities I have planned for us - like our garden.

That’s why this Fall I am so excited she suddenly is excited about our garden. She was eager to mix the new soil, write our new plot sticks, plant the seeds, and daily go out to water our immature plants. For the first time, this is all on her accord. That’s what makes it so exciting to me!

Similar to how we should approach feeding our children in those weeks, months, and even years it takes to establish healthy relationships with eating (more on that here) and for them to “learn to like” new foods (more on that here), I am reminded of the patience versus pressure required in other areas (like gardening) as well. I have tried at times to talk my oldest into “how much fun this (gardening) is” when she didn’t show much of an interest. The same could easily be said for trying to tell our kids “this tastes so good” for a food they’d otherwise pass on. But what I am remembering this month is that continuing to expose our kids to these healthy habits is a seed-planting-process.

I don’t know if my oldest will stay this enthusiastic about our garden all Fall, but what I do know is that we are planting seeds for such enthusiasm towards healthy lifestyle habits at a young age and as part of her overall development into ultimately becoming an adult someday. She may not learn to like gardening as a kid or ever, but I am confident that planting the seeds for this being a part of our life now is something that she will be able to sow from later in life.

The same can be said for the “learning it foods” and family meals we offer now that seemingly “get wasted.” While not every seed will produce fruit, I think again we can be reminded of the overall parallel planting such seeds has for creating the foundation our kids learn how to eat from.

So although it might be the postpartum hormones that have me particularly sentimental in this month’s gardening post, I think the metaphor of planting seeds, watering our garden, and waiting on the harvest is a particularly fitting reminder for how we should approach feeding and raising our kids in general. I hope it encourages you to reflect on this as much as it does me!


Veggie of the Month: Pumpkin

I am honored to be a monthly contributor to Veggie Buds Club. Intended for children ages 3-6, Veggie Buds Club offers activities that empower kids to Learn + Cook + Play + Create + Grow with a monthly vegetable. Through fun, pressure-free ideas, Veggie Buds Club helps expose your child to a variety of vegetables in age-appropriate and engaging ways.

If you are interested in checking out Veggie Buds Club for your family (or to gift a friend!), I encourage you to hop on over today! Monthly registration closes at midnight on the first of the month, so be sure to sign up so you get this month's box - complete with a tip sheet featuring the advice I share below!

Images from past month's Veggie Buds Club.

Tips shared in this month’s Veggie Buds Club: Pumpkin

We often forget about pumpkin until summer starts turning to fall and we start planning for seasonal staples like jack-o-lanterns and pumpkin pie. Pumpkins hold so much potential however as produce with a subtle flavor that packs important nutrition. Fall is a great time to both introduce pumpkin and find ways that your family enjoys eating it so you can continue to include it in your diets year round.

Since canned pumpkin packing as many vitamins, minerals, and fiber as its fresh counterpart, there is no need to stress over making your own puree (unless of course your prefer the taste or the process). Either way, these gourds are very good for you! Consider how you can add in the health benefits of beta carotene (what gives pumpkins their bright orange color!), vitamin C (to help combat cold season!), and fiber (to keep your family both full and regular!) to any meal or snack by using some of the following ideas:

Breakfast

Bake pumpkin muffins

Add pumpkin puree to smoothies

Mix pumpkin in pancake or waffle batter

Lunch

Stir pumpkin into spreads like cream cheese to smear on a sandwich

Make hummus with pumpkin for a fun flavored dip

Make pumpkin soup to enjoy as “soup & salad” or “soup & sandwich” combos

Dinner

Mix pureed pumpkin into sauces, like spaghetti

Add pumpkin to chili

Look for pumpkin-filled pastas (like ravioli or tortellini)

Snacks

Roast pumpkin seeds

Bake healthy pumpkin cookies

Roll up some pumpkin energy bites

For more recipe ideas, be sure to try out each of the recipe cards included in this month’s Veggie Buds Club! Also remember to check out Veggie Buds Club before 12/midnight on the first of every month if you aren't already a subscriber. Then you can still order this month's box and veggie in time to participate!


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Gardening with Kids: September 2018 edition

We are in a season of new beginnings here.

A new baby, the start to a new school year, and an emptied out garden from most of our summer plants.

We opted to empty out most the garden beds right before our little boy was born in order to minimize yard work in those early weeks with an infant. Plus, with how hot it gets here in Houston, we were getting very little in the way of the tomatoes, beans, squash, and cucumbers that we pulled up.

So instead, we have been focusing on adding compost, feeding the soil, and will soon do a crop rotation and plant our Fall vegetables. This is a nice "slow season" of gardening as everything else is, well, a bit crazy!


Areas of Growth in the Garden

Garden Yields Update

Total seasonal yield to date: 
103 baby tomatoes (the final 21 tomatoes picked while still green since we couldn't get them before the squirrels)
10 cucumbers
19 bell peppers
45 beans (but honestly, we didn't pick them all as the fava beans were immature inside the pod and thus inedible/not worth the effort)
7 yellow squash
4 zucchini

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New Feeding Wins or Progress via Food Play

Dirt. There is something so wonderful about it with kids.

By clearing out the actual crops in three of our four raised beds, it has given us the perfect place for free play in the soil. We look for worms, talk about how gardening works, and the girls get to use their hands and imaginations to "garden" even before the real seeds are in.

I think for this Fall, we might let each of the girls have a garden bed all for themselves. With this, they will be allowed to pick the seeds, plant them, and til to "their" soil to their hearts content. We might not grow anything or it might be wildly successful. The point is, it will be theirs and I think their ownership of having a bed to tend to (while my husband and I work on the other three) would be so empowering to their little gardener's confidence.

Although I am not too strict about anything they do to the garden as a whole, I am hoping this initial dirt free-play will spur on all the more desire for them to put on their little gloves, get their shovels, and garden as we move into Fall!


Veggie of the Month: Sweet Potatoes

I am honored to be a monthly contributor to Veggie Buds Club. Intended for children ages 3-6, Veggie Buds Club offers activities that empower kids to Learn + Cook + Play + Create + Grow with a monthly vegetable. Through fun, pressure-free ideas, Veggie Buds Club helps expose your child to a variety of vegetables in age-appropriate and engaging ways.

If you are interested in checking out Veggie Buds Club for your family (or to gift a friend!), I encourage you to hop on over today! Monthly registration closes at midnight on the first of the month, so be sure to sign up so you get this month's box - complete with a tip sheet featuring the advice I share below!

Images from past month's Veggie Buds Club.

Tips shared in this month’s Veggie Buds Club:

As Summer comes to a close and we get into Fall foods and cooler temperatures, it is a great time to talk about a root vegetable with lots of nutrition: SWEET POTATOES!

For many children as infants, sweet potatoes are an obvious first food that parents roast and serve as a puree or in soft, finger-like strips. As children get older though and begin to exert more opinion and independence around the foods they eat however, many kids shift away from sweet potatoes to preferring white potatoes in the form of french fries and tater tots.

While all potatoes offer some nutritional value in their natural form, sweet potatoes provide an added nutritional punch and more antioxidants than their white, yellow, or red counterparts. In order to get such carotenoids in your child's diet (the antioxidants that give sweet potatoes that beautiful orange color!), consider the following ways of keeping them a staple Fall food for your family:

  • SHOP: Compare and contrast potato types. On an upcoming shopping trip, let your child help pick the potatoes. Encourage them to select a couple from each potato type or color category, as most stores will offer white Russets, yellow Yukons, Red roasters, orange sweets, and sometimes ever purple potatoes as well! This helps them to see there are lots of different potato types, not to mention sizes and shapes!
  • CLEAN: Allow your children to scrub potatoes in the sink or a water table (like the one leftover from summer!). This helps to get them to touch the vegetable before it ever is offered on the table.
  • TASTE: If your child is used to only white potatoes, consider comparing white with sweet potatoes in a taste test. Bake, roast, or mash both kinds and offer side by side. Talk about how they look, smell, and taste different and allow them to rate their preferences to either. This helps kids to identify differences in foods with an inquisitive approach that emphasizes "learning to like" the attributes of a (potentially) new food instead of pressuring them to eat something that is still unfamiliar.
  • CHAIN: Consider food chaining your child's preferred type of potatoes to include sweet potatoes! You can do this by making subtle shifts to offer sweet potatoes in the same same and preparation as the preferred potato, then gradually working to include sweet potatoes in other shapes or serving methods.
  • COOK: Talk about ways you can cook each of the vegetables that you bought at the store: baked whole, roasted in cubes, sliced as fries, pureed for baked goods, mashed as a side, or in a hash at breakfast! Let your child sit with you to look through recipes and help plan which way you will prepare them for a given meal. This helps them empower their voice in meal time decisions while also piquing their curiosity around how potatoes can be offered.

Remember to check out Veggie Buds Club before 12/midnight on the first of every month if you aren't already a subscriber. Then you can still order this month's box and veggie in time to participate!


Want More Actionable Ideas on How to Turn Your Veggie Averse Kid Into A Gardener?

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Gardening with Kids: August 2018 edition

How are we already in the peak heat of Summer? In just weeks, our little man will arrive which is a good thing since this big ol' belly is having a hard time bending over to do much in the garden anymore. We have enjoyed what harvest we have gotten though this summer, are learning from what harvest we didn't yield (yet expected we would), and excited to plan for what's to come for each of the garden beds as we move from Summer to Fall.


Areas of Growth in the Garden

Garden Yields Update

Total seasonal yield to date: 
82 baby tomatoes
7 cucumbers
14 bell peppers
35 beans
7 yellow squash
4 zucchini

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New Feeding Wins or Progress via Food Play

What a great month to be sharing more on tomatoes, considering my youngest decided she has learned to like them this past month!

Admittedly, homegrown tomatoes are worlds better than those you buy from the store, but even still - last summer she would bite into them, feel them burst, then spit them out while this summer, she has started to pop them in her mouth and gobble them up!

Some days, she still decides she doesn't want them and skips them when offered or spits them out when served as part of our meal. More often then not though, she helps me "find the red ones" in the garden, eating them as we go, and then willingly initiates eating them when I put some of them on her plate.

I hope we can keep this momentum as our homegrown tomato supply dies off to the summer eat (and pesky squirrels!) and we go back to buying them at the store in the off-season!


Veggie of the Month: Tomatoes

I am honored to be a monthly contributor to Veggie Buds Club. Intended for children ages 3-6, Veggie Buds Club offers activities that empower kids to Learn + Cook + Play + Create + Grow with a monthly vegetable. Through fun, pressure-free ideas, Veggie Buds Club helps expose your child to a variety of vegetables in age-appropriate and engaging ways.

If you are interested in checking out Veggie Buds Club for your family (or to gift a friend!), I encourage you to hop on over today! Monthly registration closes at midnight on the first of the month, so be sure to sign up so you get this month's box - complete with a tip sheet featuring the advice I share below!

Images from past month's Veggie Buds Club.

Tips shared in this month’s Veggie Buds Club:

There are many kids who are obsessed with ketchup and will use it as a dip for nearly anything. Majority of kids will also chow down on pizza or maybe even spaghetti without any wonder of what the red sauce is made of. Offering a fresh, raw tomato to a child rarely goes over as easily as the above options however.

That's why for this month's tip, I encourage you to expose your child to tomatoes in their many forms and see which ways they might be most interested in trying them. For each, consider talking through with them if they "love," "like," or are "still learning to like" each type of tomato product. You could even draw a scoring guide out on a simple sheet of paper with a happy face, neutral face, and frowning face, or a green circle, a yellow circle, and a red circle for the foods they love, like, and are still learning, respectively. This will give you as the parent a starting place for introducing new foods and the potential for food chaining based on what tomato products your child loves, likes, or is still learning. Making this an engaging "taste test" activity over the course of the month also allows you to continue to bring all these options back to the tomato/veggie of the month itself (which kids may be more receptive to than if you were to just randomly offer any of the following):

  • Ketchup
  • Pizza sauce (on pizza)
  • Marinara sauce (as a dipper, for items like the zucchini dippers from last month!)
  • Spaghetti sauce
  • Make your own spaghetti sauce and let them help squeeze the whole tomatoes!
  • Salsa
  • Make your own pico de gallo and let them use a kid-safe knife to help cut the tomatoes!
  • Quarter cherry tomatoes to eat raw or in a pasta salad
  • Halve cherry tomatoes with marinated mozzarella balls
  • Skewer cherry tomatoes on kabob sticks for a BLT on a stick
  • Serve beef steak tomato slices with sliced mozzarella and/or olive oil, balsamic, salt and pepper
  • Sliced tomatoes (to eat plain with eggs or add to sandwiches, burgers, on top of pizza, etc.)
  • Roast cherry tomatoes or thick slices of tomatoes

What other ways could you offer tomatoes to your kiddos this summer?

Remember to check out Veggie Buds Club before 12/midnight on the first of every month if you aren't already a subscriber. Then you can still order this month's box and veggie in time to participate!


Want More Actionable Ideas on How to Turn Your Veggie Averse Kid Into A Gardener?

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Gardening with Kids: July 2018 edition

We are officially into the peek of summer and exploring our garden almost daily for what we can find, explore, or feast on! I hope you will find the ideas shared below on how we are learning to like vegetables and enjoying zucchini in particular (as part of this month's Veggie Buds Club) both fun and helpful!


Areas of Growth in the Garden

Garden Yields Update

Total seasonal yield to date: 
56 baby tomatoes
3 cucumbers
6 bell peppers
25 beans
7 yellow squash
3 zucchini

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New Feeding Wins or Progress via Food Play

I admit, sometimes I go out to the garden and am underwhelmed. A few beans, a squash or two, with a couple handfuls of baby tomatoes. It isn't this grand, magnificent yield that will earn me a spot at the local Farmer's Market. But is that really the goal?

Most definitely not!

What hit me this month was the significance that comes in these SMALL numbers. My four year old isn't counting to 100 yet nor is my youngest able to carry much more than a couple of this or that without them tumbling out of her arms on the way from the backyard garden to our kitchen counter. This makes our little backyard garden and the SMALL yields it offers our family perfect for helping me achieve my actual goal:

Getting my girls engaged and excited about fresh vegetables from the moment the seed hits the soil through the time they are offered at the table.

There is something about gardening that is both disconnected from the table and yet beautifully tees up to a meal time. I love that even for foods my girls are learning to like, they get to LEARN to like them in completely experiential ways without "eating" ever even being mentioned. These small amounts make it less intimidating and more manageable as well by beckoning the girls to come out and pick what few items they can find each day.

This past month, we made a chart where we could keep track of how many of each vegetable we grow. I have intended to do this each season, but now is as good of a time as any to get started! Especially since my oldest is more than able to now help count the crops, make hash marks, and add them up in sets of five so we can see our running totals. One afternoon (after we had been away and not picked in a few days), she collected 26 cherry tomatoes. It still didn't necessarily look like a lot (in my gluttonous gardener eyes), but it was A LOT to her little hands and for her little mind to count and keep track of on our chart. Better yet, this was a simple way of doing nutrition education at home that integrated so many age-appropriate activities without ever speaking to the actual "nutrition" of the foods at hand.

That's key with little kids.

They don't need to hear the word lycopene nor about its health implications before they enter kindergarten. They don't need to know how much protein are in the beans we are growing nor stress about if they're getting enough at a given meal. They don't need to be convinced to eat fresh grown cucumbers over cheddar crackers at snack time.

Nope. What they need is to touch, experience, engage, count, and play with the very foods we want them to find joy in so that ultimately, later in life, they will appreciate them to be "healthy," "everyday," and "good for them" choices. My goal is to continue to offer them the experiences that allow them to do this through our garden without really ever saying a word about "health" or "nutrition." This is the kind of pressure-free exposure and true nutrition education we are having fun with from this spring and summer. I hope your family can enjoy the same through SMALL yields and yet BIG wins.


Veggie of the Month: Zucchini

I am honored to be a monthly contributor to Veggie Buds Club. Intended for children ages 3-6, Veggie Buds Club offers activities that empower kids to Learn + Cook + Play + Create + Grow with a monthly vegetable. Through fun, pressure-free ideas, Veggie Buds Club helps expose your child to a variety of vegetables in age-appropriate and engaging ways.

If you are interested in checking out Veggie Buds Club for your family (or to gift a friend!), I encourage you to hop on over today! Monthly registration closes at midnight on the first of the month, so be sure to sign up so you get this month's box - complete with a tip sheet featuring the advice I share below!

Images from past month's Veggie Buds Club.

Tips shared in this month’s Veggie Buds Club:

Parents are constantly asking about how to get kids to eat more vegetables, especially in safe forms for sharing between older and younger siblings (who may still be learning to crunch raw veggies). This is a hard question for me to answer not so much because I am without ideas, but rather because the root of HOW to get our kids to eat more vegetables rarely rests in simply needing more ideas.

Instead, we as parents and families as a whole need to continue to shift our mindset from "HOW to GET our kids to eat vegetables" to exposing them to veggies in as many ways as we can in hopes that they find a few they genuinely WANT to eat (on their own).

Do you see the mindset shift there between "getting them to eat" and "finding ways they want to eat" vegetables?

That's why this month I want us to get out of our common rut of offering only raw versus roasted vegetables and instead share how many options there are for exposing our kids to even a single vegetable like zucchini!

Zucchini is by far one of the most versatile veggies out there! With it, we can find a variety of ways to expose and safely offer to even the youngest of eaters. Here are several ways to help your kids learn to like zucchini in the coming month!

  • As a topping on pizza
  • In lasagna (in addition to or in place of noodles)
  • As hummus (like the one from Heather in this month's Veggie Buds Club)
  • To make zucchini boats (stuffed with meat and other veggies)
  • For zucchini roll ups (just use a vegetable peeler to create a long strip)
  • As zoodles (mixed with regular noodles or in place of)
  • Tossed in with eggs or an omelet
  • Added to pasta dishes or stir fries
  • As breaded spears (with a side of marinara for dipping!)
  • Baked in circles as "chips" with Parmesan
  • Grilled on a kabob with a lean protein and/or other summer veggie
  • For dessert in cookies or brownies (like those from the recipe Heather shares in this month's Veggie Buds Club)
  • Shredded into muffins or quick breads

Even just making this list compels me to go check the garden to see if we have any zucchini ready to make something with! There are so many options, i.e. reasons we don't need to be in rut with how to offer this seasonal veggie!

Remember to check out Veggie Buds Club before 12/midnight on the first of every month if you aren't already a subscriber. Then you can still order this month's box and veggie in time to participate!


Want More Actionable Ideas on How to Turn Your Veggie Averse Kid Into A Gardener?

Subscribe here for updates and early bird access anytime there is a new resource added and available!


For More Posts on Gardening with Kids:

Gardening with Kids: June 2018 edition

We have officially made it one year into cultivating our own home garden, so I am finally getting on the ball with sharing more about our journey up to this point.

Many of you have asked for details about our experiences gardening with kids in our backyard garden, so I will be sharing monthly updates here in hopes to further inspire other families to help their children to learn to like fresh foods from the ground up!

Be it a vertical garden indoors, a small backyard garden on the patio, or simply planting a single seed in a disposable cup on the kitchen counter, I hope that sharing our very amateur-level entry into at-home gardening with kids will remind anyone on the fence about it that you too can garden. You just have to start somewhere!

Below is a recap of our journey thus far, as well as other information I will be sharing each month to give further inspiration for how to include veggies in your family's daily life!


Backyard Garden Progress June 2018

This is far from a complete recap, but below are some of the progress highlights from the past year with our backyard garden.

 
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April 2017

  • My husband created built-in garden beds in our back yard for my 30th birthday gift [DIY tutorial for the ones he made coming soon! Subscribe here to find out when it is available.]
  • Planted our first set of Spring seeds and starter plants. Crops included: zucchini, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, bell peppers, green bean varietals, jalapeno peppers, strawberries, and carrots
  • Total seasonal yield: 18 large and 106 cherry tomatoes, 12 cucumbers, one teeny carrot, two strawberries, one radish, eleven okra, 32 green beans, 2 jalapenos, 29 extra long green beans, and 16 sugar snap peas.
  • Items we would/would probably opt to do next year: the extra long green bean variety we grew we didn't know how to cook and thus didn't eat/enjoy to its fullest potential. We need to learn to like okra more, or else plant less as it was not our favorite crop. The squash and zucchini never took, so we will try those again with healthier starter plants hopefully. Our bell peppers also never produced, so we will need to figure out why and try again in upcoming years. We need to figure out how to help the carrots and radishes thrive better as well, as each produced a nominal crop.
 

October 2017

  • Rotated the crops between each bed per plot rotation recommendations I had read [Gardening rotation guide with what we have done coming soon! Subscribe here to find out when it is available.]
  • Planted our first set of Fall seeds and starter plants. Crops included: kale, romaine, red leaf lettuce, rainbow chard, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.
  • Total seasonal yield: endless kale (three varieties), romaine, and red leaf lettuce, four batches of rainbow chard, 11 Brussels sprouts, one small head of purple cauliflower, and three heads broccoli.
  • Items we would/would probably opt to do next year: we loved having so many different greens and how we didn't have to buy lettuce, kale, or salad greens for several months. The Brussels Sprouts looked promising all season and yet produced very few viable sprouts to snap off and actually consume. We will need to learn how to improve each stalks yield in coming years. The cauliflower rotted quickly, so we will need to either eat when it is still small or figure out how to keep it thriving to a larger size next year. Lesson learned on the broccoli is how it can continue to produce florets even after the main broccoli head has been removed (to eat). We likely could have gotten more yield from this had we known.
 
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April 2018

  • Rotated the crops between each bed per plot rotation recommendations I had read [Gardening rotation guide with what we have done coming soon! Subscribe here to find out when it is available.]
  • Planted our second Spring's worth of seeds and starter plants. Crops include: zucchini, yellow squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, bell peppers, jalapeno peppers, carrots, three green bean varietals.
  • We invested around $75 total for all of the seeds and starter plants we needed to start a new season. No new soil was needed from the past year, as we had added homemade compost prior to planting/preparing the garden for Spring.

 

More Updates and Resources to Come!

As part of an upcoming collaboration and project, I will be sharing how-to guides for backyard gardening with kids. To stay up to date on when updates and resources are available, subscribe here!


Veggie of the Month: Radish

I am honored to be a monthly contributor to Veggie Buds Club. Intended for children ages 3-6, Veggie Buds Club offers activities that empower kids to Learn + Cook + Play + Create + Grow with a monthly vegetable. Through fun, pressure-free ideas, Veggie Buds Club helps expose your child to a variety of vegetables in age-appropriate and engaging ways.

If you are interested in checking out Veggie Buds Club for your family (or to gift a friend!), I encourage you to hop on over today! Monthly registration closes at midnight on the first of the month, so be sure to sign up so you get this month's box - complete with a tip sheet featuring the advice I share below!

Tips shared in this month’s Veggie Buds Club:

Did you know one of the best steps you can take to getting your kids to TASTE a new food is breaking through the barrier to getting them to TOUCH it?

That's why Spring becomes a particularly fun time to help kids learn to like new produce, including radishes. Here are some ideas to breakthrough the barrier of neophobia (or fear towards new foods) in ways that emphasize kids to TOUCH before we as parents expect they will TASTE:

1. Plant your own radish.

Use your growing kit from this month's Veggie Buds Club, or go to a local gardening store for some seeds and soil. Even if you don't have an at home garden, you can plant radishes in their own small pot for each child. The exposure to the vegetable before it is even grown or in edible form can make for effective nutrition education away from the table!

2. Let your child clean the radish.

Whether you grow your own radish, pick some up at the farmer's market, or grab some at the grocery store, ask your children to be in charge of washing them. As a vegetable that grows underground, you can use this as an excuse to get your kids hands on with washing the dirt away. This helps kids to become comfortable with touching it when there is no expectation that they should too eat it.

3. Consider a visual assessment.

Away from a meal time, consider cutting up a few different radish varieties as part of an experiment. Ask your child(ren) to pick up each variety and then either draw pictures or explain the similarities and differences of each (colors, shapes, smells, touch, etc.). Once they have handled and engaged with each, ask your child(ren) questions that probe interest and potentially a desire to take a bite of each to further compare and contrast differences, like: "Which type of radish do you think is the prettiest? Which one do you think tastes the best? Do you think they all taste the same?"

Having this kind of hands on, pressure-free exposure away from offering new foods (like radish) at meal times can be a great way to get kids learning to like new vegetables before they've ever had it on their plate!

Remember to check out Veggie Buds Club before 12/midnight on the first of every month if you aren't already a subscriber. Then you can still order this month's box and veggie in time to participate!


Other Areas of Growth in the Garden

Garden Yields Update

Total seasonal yield to date (June 1st): 6 yellow squash, 3 zucchini, 1 small cucumber, 11 cherry tomatoes, 17 broad beans

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New Feeding Wins or Progress via Food Play

The girls continue to enjoy picking the tomatoes best. Each girl will put the tomato in her mouth but seems apprehensive towards biting down and how it "bursts" in their mouths. The most fun the girls have had this past month was in pretend play having a "restaurant" with all of the produce we picked that day. They washed it (in this DIY water table), then prepared pretend "recipes" from the ingredients. They dressed up and served these meals as a chef and waitress for hours of creative play. While it didn't lead them to eating any of the produce then and there, it got them comfortable and familiar with it before we as a family used the ingredients in actual meals!


Want More Actionable Ideas on How to Turn Your Veggie Averse Kid Into A Gardener?

Subscribe here for updates and early bird access anytime there is a new resource added and available!